Education In Thailand Given Low Rating By Unesco

In the latest report published by Unesco, it states that the education system in Thailand should be improved and there are significant challenges that should be improved in among all the standards of age group in the county. This report pertains to government schools in the country not including any international school in Bangkok as their standard of education is different from public schools.

In the report entitled 2017/2018 Global Education Monitoring Report or GEMR, there was focus given on the role of the government to make sure that everyone gets a universal form of education with the highest standard possible. The organization also stressed that accountability is very crucial in order to accomplish this goal.

Irina Bokova, the director general of Unesco, said that education is a responsibility divided among different bodies including the government, schools, staffs, teachers, parents as well as private sectors.

Everyone should be held accountable for the role they play such as the method used by teachers in teaching, the learning by the students and the actions taken by the government. Careful planning is necessary by employing important principles such as quality, equity and inclusion.

The accountability system of Thailand is determined by the test scores but the fact is that the results have yet to improve between the year 2003 and 2015.

The nation failed to publish a report starting 2006 regarding the monitoring they have conducted on their national education. The Unesco report also states that the education system in the country has no regulations when it comes to the maximum number of students that an educator should be assigned both in primary and secondary levels.

They report also took a hit on the evaluation system for the teachers which is based solely on the feedback given by the students.

Unesco enumerated the challenges that the Thai education system is currently facing including the fact that 99 per cent of students are able to get primary education but only 85 per cent gets a secondary education in the lower level. Half of these students are not taught in their home language. These challenges should be addressed and they should follow the standard by an international school in Bangkok in order to produce more competitive citizens in the future.

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